1. I’ll never get over smiley mazdas

  2. flying first claaaaasss (up in the sky)

  3. durnesque-esque:

ramblingsofanintrovert:

lesbianvenom:

there’s something really interesting in this passage that I wanted to point out Trelawney assumes that Harry was born in midwinter because of his “dark hair” and “mean stature” and “tragic losses so young in life” Tom Riddle was born in midwinter, is describe in CoS as resembling Harry, and his mother died right after his birth Harry has a piece of Voldemort’s soul in him that’s why Trelawney made that assumption

TRELAWNY WAS ACTUALLY A GREAT SEER SHE JUST MESSED UP SOMETIMES AND ACTED A LITTLE GOOFY SO NO ONE TOOK HER SERIOUSLY

BECAUSE CLASSICAL ALLUSIONS 
For those of you who don’t know your Greek mythology, Cassandra was the daughter of the King and Queen of Troy. Apollo tried to get in her pants by giving her the gift of prophecy and took nice guy douche-bagging to a godly level by cursing her when she turned him down. 
The curse? That she would never be believed. 
So all of Cassandra’s warnings to the people of Troy fell on deaf ears. 
And in case you don’t remember, Trelawny mentions that her great-great-grandmother’s name was … you guessed it… “Cassandra” 

    durnesque-esque:

    ramblingsofanintrovert:

    lesbianvenom:

    there’s something really interesting in this passage that I wanted to point out
    Trelawney assumes that Harry was born in midwinter because of his “dark hair” and “mean stature” and “tragic losses so young in life”
    Tom Riddle was born in midwinter, is describe in CoS as resembling Harry, and his mother died right after his birth
    Harry has a piece of Voldemort’s soul in him
    that’s why Trelawney made that assumption

    TRELAWNY WAS ACTUALLY A GREAT SEER SHE JUST MESSED UP SOMETIMES AND ACTED A LITTLE GOOFY SO NO ONE TOOK HER SERIOUSLY

    BECAUSE CLASSICAL ALLUSIONS 

    For those of you who don’t know your Greek mythology, Cassandra was the daughter of the King and Queen of Troy. Apollo tried to get in her pants by giving her the gift of prophecy and took nice guy douche-bagging to a godly level by cursing her when she turned him down. 

    The curse? That she would never be believed. 

    So all of Cassandra’s warnings to the people of Troy fell on deaf ears. 

    And in case you don’t remember, Trelawny mentions that her great-great-grandmother’s name was … you guessed it… “Cassandra” 

    Reblogged from: googleberryitis
  4. whitegirlsaintshit:

    modelingschool:

    elijahd0m:

    Cykeem White & Alexander Dominguez

    okayyyy. 

    *train emoji*

    Reblogged from: googleberryitis
  5. I just should let my okcupid profile read “sorry, I have no idea”

  6. "I’m gay… Are you okay? You’re having a mouth spasm."
    Reblogged from: indragamano
  7. aprill-showers:

    Various works from Michelle Robinson

    Reblogged from: clothabidingcitizen
  8. nezua:

    rubyvroom:

    Sorry for the extremely lengthy post on your dashes but this is so important

    The world is watching, White America.

    FIGHT TERRORISM, STOP COPS.

    Reblogged from: mistypical
  9. Reblogged from: topaintfeathers
  10. Reblogged from: 47mystics
  11. My Shiny Teeth and Me - Chip Skylark

    Reblogged from: atouchofdestiny
  12. carsontheroad:

Classic and antique cars (till 1998)selected by CarsOnTheRoad

    carsontheroad:

    Classic and antique cars (till 1998)
    selected by CarsOnTheRoad

    Reblogged from: carsontheroad
  13. Frank Ocean | Wisemen

    “Frank Ocean wrote a fantastic ballad that was truly lovely and poetic in every way, there just wasn’t a scene for it. I could have thrown it in quickly just to have it, but that’s not why he wrote it and not his intention. So I didn’t want to cheapen his effort. But, the song is fantastic, and when Frank decides to unleash it on the public, they’ll realize it then.”

    — Quentin Tarantino explaining why he didn’t use the song in “Django Unchained.”

    Reblogged from: clothabidingcitizen
  14. oeon:

    I mean, most IQ tests are testing pattern recognition, right?a But only because fast pattern recognition is aggrandized (in my opinion) as an indicator of intelligence. Declaring pattern recognition in this form as a reliable indicator of intelligence seems far too huge of a logical leap to make.

    Consider the fact that intelligence is defined as the ability to acquire and apply knowledge and skills.b Pattern recognition is a useful cognitive skill, maybe, but it definitely doesn’t equate to intelligence directly. Perhaps there is a correlation between the ability to recognize patterns and the ability to acquire and apply knowledge and skills, but it’s not an obviously sound conjecture.

    My problem is that pattern recognition in a timed, “isolated”, and “”novel”“c environment doesn’t tell me at all about how the test-taker is actually making the decision.

    {assumption}It would seem that the IQ test is valuing data-driven or bottom-up processing of the questions. The test taker should be unfamiliar with the questions, (perhaps even the premise of the testing), and they should be unaffected by outside interference.

    If the ideal test environment is applied, the pattern recognition is supposedly then an indicator of learning in real-time, and the test-taker’s “”“”“propensity for learning”“”“” will theoretically allow them to recognize certain patterns (within an appropriate time frame).{/assumption}

    But what does speed have to do with it? How do you measure what amount of time is reasonable for pattern-learning to take place in an individual of average intelligence? Which patterns can be assessed as obvious and therefore only requiring average intelligence to recognize quickly? Which can be assessed as obscure enough to requisite high intelligence before quick recognition is possible? How do you relate the effect of familiarity (with the premise of the test, or elements of the questions) with performance?

    As far as I can see, there are no objective metrics, only the say-so of the people who made (or influenced the makers of) some of the most popular IQ tests in the first place (spoiler alert: they suck[1]).

    Maybe I’m just too conservative about intelligence-based hypotheses in general, but I think anyone who claims not only to quantify intelligence but to measure it accurately must be incredibly self-aggrandizing. I think the people who made IQ tests to be definitive indicators of intelligence created tests that allocate higher IQ scores to people who are similar to them. After all, if true intelligence lay elsewhere, how would they be qualified to assess it?

    IQ tests are at bestd precise. High IQ scores may correspond to a certain kind of person. Whether or not such a person is intelligent…. well, I suppose you have to really believe in intelligence as an individually qualifiable concept to dig that hole that any further!

    ———-

    a) genuine question, feel free to correct this assumption

    b) we could always argue with this definition to throw more rocks into the filter. for instance, “ability” is almost always context-dependent

    c) extra quote marks for extra sarcasm

    d) ””“”“”“best”“”“”“”


    [1]  These are the same people that are responsible for the gross scientific and human rights atrocities that are the outcome of the eugenics theory (some of whose theories dominate educational systems to this day Frown). The tests, particularly those used in the US, were normalized to the demonstrable mental capacity of common middle-class white males, then used as justification for further subjugation of the country’s poor/non-male/non-white population, and of course the mentally disabled.

    If you’re so inclined, you can read more about:

    I think I am completely wary of intelligence measurements in any capacity, because after revealing the origins of the tests, the function is highly suspect. Over and over, intelligence measurement is constructed in such a way that reinforces racial, economic, and sociocultural hierarchy. Pretty convenient how those who construct the intelligence metrics are often at the top of that hierarchy…



    P.S. - Forgive any egregious mistakes— I started writing this on a whim and it turned into a 6-hour research and writing venture, I have no less than 20 tabs open right now -_-”. Point is, I don’t have it in me to give it a 30th read-through for comprehension.

    my prof responded B]

    Reblogged from: oeon
  15. How odd, I can have all this inside me
    and to you it’s just words.
    David Foster Wallace  (via buddhabrot)
    Reblogged from: googleberryitis
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